400mm

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #7075
    lalandi
    Participant

    Scenario. Fishing a river with max size limit of 400mm, 8lber is landed but bleeding badly and very unlikely to survive. Do you return it knowing it will die slowly and potentially look ugly for the next anglers to see it? Or kill it humanely and bung it in the smoker when you get home? We were faced with this yesterday. We were all aware of the rules and did our best to minimise harm by removing trebles ( 2 spinning, 2 fly), using a net etc. Much debate on the river bank, opinions divided!

    I’ll let you know what we did after a few replies.

    #18948
    troutfishernz
    Participant

    I think you will find even if the fish is bleeding and going to die you still need to return it to the water.
    I guess there is no way for a ranger to tell if the fish was killed intentionly or not.

    Ive had the same problem, cought a 6lber in a 500mm size limit area a few years ago and the fish was gut hooked and bleeding, So I just cut the line and hoped the fish survived.

    #18949
    Miliwolf
    Participant

    If its longer then 400mm it needs to be returned, if it shorter then 400mm and you are below your daily limit you are allowed to keep it.

    #18952
    yellowfin
    Participant

    I caught and released a 6lb brown from a lake last summer that was bleeding from the gills. At the time I was unsure what to do as I have heard that trout are like paua in that they don’t stop bleeding. This fish swam 5m out into the lake before going belly up and sinking to the bottom. The lake at this point was several meters deep which ruled out the possiblity of me diving down to retrieve it, but I need not have worried because 10mins later it righted itself and swam strongly out into the lake..much to my relief!!..trout do stop bleeding and in my experience if you hold them long enough in the drink they will come right.

    #18961
    lalandi
    Participant

    As I said we were aware of the rules and that the trout had to be returned. I know the rule can’t be- Must not exceed 400mm unless dead or likely to die, otherwise every big trout would be deemed unlikely to survive. However…

    Just because a trout swims away does not mean it has survived, it means it swam away. I have released trout only to find them belly up 1km down stream. I have also seen trout almost completely missing a gill plate that appeared healthy so it was a tough call. This trout was not going to survive and while 2 of us (me and the angler) were convinced it had to go back regardless the other two were just as adamant it was inhumane to release it and a very bad look for the next group of anglers down stream from us.

    Apparently it was delicious.

    #18962
    yellowfin
    Participant

    I guess it’s a matter of take it at your own risk.. you could get hit with a pretty big fine if you were caught with it, but it’s a waste of fish you could eat if you release it and you’re 100% sure it will die anyway.
    I had a similar situation with a moki 2cm under the limit that washed up dead on the beach after I released it, still big enough for a meal at that size but you wouldn’t want to be caught with it because there would be no way to prove you didn’t deliberately kill it.

    #18964
    yellowfin
    Participant

    Evidently trout blood does not contain clotting agents like animals do and so bleed profusely
    and die.When a trout seems to recover it is only from the stress from being caught and the build up
    of lactic acid.I suspect most bleeders will cark it sooner or later.To take a trout in such cirumstances
    is up to the angler to be prepared to risk losing his fishing gear over a feed of trout.I take wasabi and soy with me so then you can neck it in hurry if the need arises.

    #18969
    Miliwolf
    Participant

    trout blood does clot, how else would they survive the stab wounds and other gruesome injuries they get from shags and the like.

    #18970
    yellowfin
    Participant

    Trout blood clots for sure..they are a hardy fish and take a real beating from floods,anglers,eels and shags to name a few.I’ve caught salmon and sea run trout with chunks missing from them!!

    #18972
    yellowfin
    Participant

    I am only reporting what I read by a freshwater biologist.Its the bleeding from gill area that
    they have trouble stopping.There is not a lot of blood under the skin areas.Most of it around spine and head and gills.Their blood clotting is poor like a heamophilliacs.In the end ,who cares.You just have to be gentle with them, as I am sure you guys are.

    #18974
    Miliwolf
    Participant

    Fish are weird, I have caught fish with damaged and broken gills which show signs of healing but have seen plenty die from what seems like minor wounds. As a general rule, when its legal, I do keep any fish which is bleeding but release such a fish is no guarantee of death either.

    #20077
    yellowfin
    Participant

    not fully on topic but kinda is just not on trout but i have caught skate missing their tail a recent stingray zac caught also was missing its tail which i believe commercial trawlers do to them. caught kahawai missing parts of their tails and cod also. along with various other fish missing part of gill plates have chunks taken and bite marks which look to have healed. it is a tough one it just comes down too are you willing to risk it and then the feeling of will it actually survive which well no one really knows for sure some may while others wont. a few of the kahawai i got over my xmas break i intended on releasing but they were bleeding alot so kept. i know this isnt too do with trout but in general it is a similar practice.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.