Published On: Tue, Jul 7th, 2015

Rakaia River Salmon Fishing Contest Photographs

Rakaia River Salmon Contests Photographs

2003-2010 Photographs Allan Burgess

A second gallery will be posted on this page soon!

The Rakaia River Salmon Fishing Competition is a major highlight on the angler’s social calendar. Entry tickets are usually limited due to the size of the hall at Rakaia where the prize-giving is held. So if you wish to enter it pays to get your tickets early. The competition runs over three days during late February and early March. It is very well run, has tremendous prizes, and attracts entrants from all over new Zealand. For tickets and further details see the Rakaia River Fishing Promotions link below.

Rakaia River Fishing Promotions have been running a salmon fishing competition since 1983 which makes us the most successful fresh water fishing competition and the only salmon fishing competition in New Zealand.

Rakaia River Salmon Fishing

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Canterbury Salmon


Anglers fishing for salmon during a fishing contest held in the tidal reaches of the Waimakariri River back in March 2012. Salmon are the premier sports fish in Canterbury. Catching them regularly requires experience and persistence.

Rakaia Salmon

Fishing for salmon in the surf at the mouth of Canterbury's Rakaia River during the annual salmon fishing competition. Salmon are caught in the surf as they gather off the river mouth before running the river.

Chinook Salmon Parr

This video captures juvenile chinook salmon which have developed from "fry" to become "parr" and are about 40-50mm long. They will remain and feed in the stream until they become "smolt" and large enough to migrate to the sea. The survivors will return to the same stream in 2-3 years time as fully grown adult salmon. Video by Kevin Belcher. Published 27 August 2018

This video captures a pair of Chinook Salmon Spawning in a Canterbury Stream. The jack chases off an intruder from the redd. The eggs laid by the hen can be clearly seen while the jack fertilizes them. The hen then uses her tail to cover the eggs with shingle. Video by Kevin Belcher. 10 May 2018