Categories: Feathered Lures

Brunton Number-1 and Brunton Red, trout fly fishing lures

Old time Canterbury sea-run trout lure Brunton No.1. (white chenille, brown hackles, paradise duck breast feathers for cheeks). All are…

Old time Canterbury sea-run trout lure

Brunton No.1

Brunton No.1. (white chenille, brown hackles, paradise duck breast feathers for cheeks).

All are tied with oval silver ribbing and for a modern touch a few strands of Flashabou. Use either Kamasan or Black Magic lure hooks in size 2. Some of the sea-runs in the lower Rakaia are approaching double figures, and there is always the possibility of a salmon to consider! This is another Canterbury lure used especially for sea-run trout fishing. It was created by Lou Brunton.

Tail: Brown hackle whisks. Body: White Chenille. Rib: Flat or round silver tinsel. Wing: 2 or 4 brown hackles trapped under the ribbing matuku style. Cheeks of male paradise duck. Head; Black. Throat hackle in brown (optional). I prefer to use the B175 Kamasan – Heavy Traditional Trout hooks which have been chemically sharpened, or Black Magic B2 lure hooks.When fished in the lower Rakaia River you might also take a salmon or kahawai as well as a big sea-run brown trout.

Brunton Red. This is a good lure for use in low light and for night fishing, particularly for sea-run brown trout.

Brunton Red Like many of the Canterbury lures there are at least two colour versions of the Brunton. The second red bodied version, which can be found in several books, is known as a Brunton Red. The wing is brown or red furnace, and instead of the paradise duck breast feathers, it has a topping of green peacock sword. This red version is likely more of a night-fly but it certainly would also take trout during the day.

You are generally not going to see this lure available in most tackle stores. The materials are readily available so you will easily be able to tie up some yourself. The older Canterbury sea-run trout lures were often tied with a heavy rounded torpedo-shaped body that better resembled the locally abundant smelt.

This post was last modified on 17/10/2018 8:04 pm

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