Top Five Trout Spinners which catch fish.

Posted By Miliwolf On With 0 Comments

This topic contains 3 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Miliwolf 7 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #7140

    Miliwolf
    Participant

    Spinning for trout is not only a whole lot of fun but also a very effective way to catch them. A competent spin fisherman should be able to out fish all but the top streamer fishermen and they do not have back casts to worry about. There are hundreds of spinning lures available, and even more colour and size variations and most if not all of them can catch fish. Below are my favorite trout lures, these are the ones I use most often.

    #5[b:1vdpg71a] Floating Rapala[/b:1vdpg71a]

    This lure has been around for years and is still one of the most effective on the market. Rapala has since released alternatives such as the floating x-rap but I still prefer the original. This is quite a strategic lure to use, its very light weight makes it difficult to cast even on light gear, but the same light weight allows it to float. This is a excellent lure to fish around structure, either submerged trees or patches of weeds. Cast it out, and it floats, start to retrieve and it darts downwards, get to a obstacle, stop winding and it returns to the surface, gently encourage it over the obstacle then start the retrieve again. Trout also prefer to prowl beneath overhanging trees, often in areas where it is impossible to cast. The floating Rapala can solve this. This technique only works under specific conditions. If these a current, cast out and allow the lure to be carried by the current, it would pivot around and would be carried beneath the canopy and would be parallel to the bank. Then start the retrieve. There are plenty of Alternatives, and the Storm Wildeye is a very effective lure, but I get way to many gill hook ups so discontinued using them.

    My Favorite sizes are F3 and F5. Colour depends on river condition. So When the river is clear go for natural colours, when dirty can go for something bright like fire tiger. At night can try a dark colour for better contrast.

    #4[b:1vdpg71a] Indiana Blade spinner[/b:1vdpg71a].

    These are sold under many different brands, the most famous being Mepps or Veltic. The cheaper options are often made from soft wires so would bend with the first strike. These are my preferred choice for fishing braided rivers. Cast upstream and across and use a fairly steady retrieve, the little blade spins around giving off lots of flash and vibrations. In deeper, slower water allow it to sink for a while before retrieve, in slow water the trout have more time for a closer look so a faster retrieve can be beneficial. When the blade is spinning, and the lure is being correctly fished there should be a slight vibration on the rod tip.

    They came in many different sizes, colours and finishes. My preferences are quite clear, I find the tiny ones to light to cast, so I stick with size #2 and #3, they are heavy enough to get decent distance. With regards to colour I like using bright, either orange/black or blue/silver seems to work well. The smallest size is suppose to be good for stream trout but I find tiny Rapala’s are more effective.

    #3 [b:1vdpg71a]Yo-Zuri Mag Minnow[/b:1vdpg71a]

    This lure has a lot in common with the Floating Rapala, and can be fished in a similar fashion. The main difference is the magnet weight transfer system, when casting the weight goes to the back of the lure allowing for extra distance, when retrieving the weight is locked to the bottom providing improved balance. This is my go to lure when I want to fish a floating lure but can not get the distance with the floating Rapala. There are alternatives, one being the discontinued Rapala LC which is also a excellent lure along with a better colour selection but the Mag Minnow seems to cast further.

    I have found, in the larger sizes correct tuning and balance is less important so even the significantly cheaper Chinese alternatives can be worth fishing. They are a good option for fishing around structure.

    #2 [b:1vdpg71a] Rapala Husky Jerk[/b:1vdpg71a]

    These are slightly larger lures, they contain internal ball bearings to allow improved casting distance (not quite as good as the dedicated distance options above) and to give off a rattle while being retrieved. The big secret of this lure is its suspending action. When on the retrieve it dives down like the floating options above, but when the retrieve stops the lure stops and suspends mid-water. This sudden freeze can trigger the strike instinct on a chasing trout making it one deadly lure.

    #1 [b:1vdpg71a] Rapala CountDown[/b:1vdpg71a]

    The CD is a excellent lure, cast it out and then it starts to sink at a fairly predictable rate of 30cm/ Sec. So if the water is about 2 meters deep and the fish are holding deep it can be cast out, allowing to sink for 5 seconds before starting the retrieve with the knowledge that the lure is running near the bottom. To make this lure even better is its relatively heavy weight, the tiny CD01 can outcast most comparably sizes lures. So when distance, and a small lure is required these are the best option I have tried which catch fish.

    My favorite option is the tiny CD01, which casts like a bullet and uses only a single treble hook so it snags less weed. Good for fishing in weedy spring creeks, cast out into a channel, let sink before doing a quick retrieve, flick it across any weed then allow it to sink and retrieve again. The slightly larger CD03 is another excellent lure, the action might be slightly better although the double treble hooks catch much more weeds. Could remove one of the trebles but that changes the action.

    For more information (including pictures) on many more Spinners and how to fish them I recommended “Trolling & Spin Fishing for Trout” by Allan Burgess

    https://fishingmag.co.nz/Assets/Troll-Spin-eBook/Trolling-and-Spin-Fishing-Splash-2.htm

    So this is my fourth edition of my summer series of tackle posts.

    #25163

    ripshitandbust
    Participant

    great post. What is your recommendation for bibbed trolling lures? I routinely use rapala CD7’s They are expensive I pick them up cheap off ebay. Are there some good alternatives which give a bit of depth? I have a downrigger but in some places like the ahuriri arm of benmore it’s not really much use due to the shallow nature of the edges

    #25165

    yellowfin
    Participant


    [b:bjt16xnr]Mepps Black Fury[/b:bjt16xnr]

    [b:bjt16xnr]Rapala Countdown CD7[/b:bjt16xnr]
    A mate of mine regularly fishes the middle reaches of the Waimakariri River. He spins almost exclusively with small blade spinners like the Mepps. He catches a lot of rainbows, browns, and always a few salmon each summer. He says he doesn’t loose that many of his blade spinners and regards them as a small price to pay for the good fish he catches. The Rapala Countdown CD 5 and 7 is another deadly lure that can be used to catch trout in clear water. It fishes well in different situations from being cast upstream, where it can drift down on to holding fish, cast close to weed beds in a lake, or cast out around a lake edge, or close to a stream bank. It is light and not easy to cast any distance. Trout just love them!
    What a great post Miliwolf. I haven’t even tried a Yo-Zuri Mag Minnow. I had to do a Google search. They look good. I’ll get some and give them a go. Anglers often stick to tried and tested lures they have caught fish on in the past. :grin:

    #25167

    shark slayer
    Participant

    if the edges are shallow a cd7 with no downrigger is all you would need otherwise a downrigger like you said you have is best..if you find the cd7 isnt deep enough and the down rigger is to deep then just add a small sinker a foot in front of youe lure..i have used yo zuri magnet minnows for a long time now and they are deadly..rapalas yo zuris and softbaits are all as effective as each other its just a matter of using common sense to figure wich is best to use in different situations.i personally much prefer fly fishing to spin fishing when it comes to trout these days..its much more versatile and suits a larger variety of situations better..i find nymphing to be way more productive..but when theres plenty of flow and colour i bring out the spin gear..its funny how we over think gear sometimes tho..when predatory species are around in numbers anything works..i caught heaps of perch a few weeks ago on bare jigheads..and in the dark!!! :lol:

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