Freespool/Overhead Reels

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 37 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #6760
    yellowfin
    Participant

    Has anyone had much experience with freespool reels for surfcasting? I was looking at getting a freespool setup, but the only problem is that I’d have to get a rod suited to overhead reels to match it. As far as I’m aware none of my rods are made for overheads. I know the Abu 7000’s are quite popular, but I’d rather something with a bit more line capacity. I think one of the bigger Abu models is the BG10000 and holds 400m/15kg , and is currently on sale for $200 by discountfishingsupplies due to overstock. Another reel I’ve seen good reviews about is the Daiwa Sealine range. I’ve seen quite a few different models around – XSHA, SHV, HV, SG, H – not sure what the main differences are though. They all come in sizes 20/30/50. The biggest model holds around 450yd of 25lb, so they are quite a big reel for general surfcasting, and obviously you’d get more distance out of the smaller 20/30 models. There’s also the Daiwa 7HT and the Penn 525, but I’m pretty sure they’re more expensive than the others.

    But probably harder to find than a reel is a surf rod made for overhead reels and in a reasonable price range. I know there is the Abu Ultra Cast 10ft model made for use with the Ambassadeur, and it is on sale for $87.

    #12904
    Miliwolf
    Participant

    You should catch yourself a Yeahnah with this thread.

    The Daiwa SL30SH is a popular reel, it has slightly more line capacity then my Emblem Pro and is half the weight. Freespools need large line capacities because the drags are so weak it is easy for fish to take lots of line. Plus having heaps of line means there is still a bit on the reel after cutting all of the birdnest out :lol:

    I should probably leave this thread now for people who know what they are talking about.

    #12905
    yellowfin
    Participant

    Apparently the drag on the Daiwa Sealines is meant to be quite good, but I’m not too sure about the Abu’s. I’d say the Abu’s are more suited to a lighter set up or casting for salmon, not a heavy surf setup with 30 – 40lb mono or braid.

    #12910
    Miliwolf
    Participant

    I believe that the Daiwa SL30SH, Penn 525, Abu 7000 are all popular surf reels. Probably best to buy one with magnet casting control to help prevent spool overrun.

    I might be wrong but I believe abu has quite a few different 7000 versions.

    There is also the Shimano TLD25, probably the most popular reel for targeting kingfish from the rocks. I believe it is quite unforgiving to cast.

    #12930
    yellowfin
    Participant

    Yeah you caught me :grin:

    The daiwa sl 30 is an awesome tank of a reel that has been in continuous production for over 10 years now .I have two of them and rate them very very highly .
    The drags are strong the gears are nearly indestructible and when set up right they can deliver BIG casts .

    First thing to understand is the braking system on freespools .

    The daiwas and some abus use centrifugal brakes two small plastic brake blocks that are attached to the side of the spool . When you hit the cast the spool spins up to speed and the two blokes slide out and contact the brake ring on the inside of the sideplate.
    The bigger the blocks the more braking you have. Start with the biggest and work your way down to the smaller ones if needed.

    Mag brakes ( penn 525 mag abu sports mag ) As an alloy spool spins it crates a magnetic feild ( lens law if you want to google it ) If you place a magnet near that spinning spool the two magnetic fields fight each other and you get a braking effect .Big plus for this system is its ease of adjustment with most reels having a sliding switch or knob on the side to adjust how close the magnets are to the spool.

    Oil braking .The above reels all run on small bearings and the grade of oil in the bearings also can help control the surge of power at the start of the cast .Have a look at TG rocket oil for how that works.

    Line level the less line the more braking the reel has as the lower the line level the more spins the spool has to make to pay out more line .( Dont be tempted to fill the spool to the very top )

    A sl30h with two red blocks and tg red oil loaded with 8 or 10kg line is very very easy to cast and will not only deal to most things swimming it will work for years and years..Mine have had beaten up badly dropped dunked ( cleaned after ) sandblasted cast 1000send of times landed some good fish… landed some very good fish LOL been used on boats as well had the drags heated up by kings and rays and they still keep ticking just that damm good!
    I have penn 525 and 535 mags as well and they are just as awesome .
    My abus are all never going to see the sea again the have all been modded for distance casting now.

    IMHO A sl30 or 535 size reel is as big as need for most surfcasting .
    I also have a sl50h for when the BIG sharks are around but the bigger reels are a bit harder to cast and control

    I dragged one of my fixed spool rigs out the other day a solaris with a emcast on it …Felt heavy and unbalanced :lol:

    Google Neil MacKellow ands have a read of his reel tuning quide lines.

    The rods yeah you need to get a few more guides on the rod ideally as the last thing you want is the line to come in contact with the blank when its bent over on a fast running fish . Not all that hard to do yourself

    #12935
    yellowfin
    Participant

    The Solaris has 8 guides which is quite a lot I thought, but I’m not sure it’s meant to bend the opposite way?

    #12936
    yellowfin
    Participant

    Much is made of the spine of the rod business .Dont bother yourself about it just stick a reel on the rod run the line out the guides and loop the end of the line around a fence post or sim .Lean back and load the rod up and see what the line does .It should run nice and smoothly between each quide without any real sharp bends if poss. Normally you might need to add 1 or 2 at the top end of the rod.

    Most peole get scared off feespools due to the birdsnest effect but if you start with the reels set quite slow its rarly a problem.Even in the dark you soon get a feel for the cast and know when to put your thumb down to stop the spool once the rig hits the water.

    My fishing reels are very slow compared to my tournament reels but I am not trying to cast them 200+ meters

    Plus no wind up the drag pick up the line on the finger flip over the bail… cast flip the bail back over undo the drag again etc etc .

    #12937
    yellowfin
    Participant

    So most rods are fine bending any direction? I see some rods have features such as ‘multidirectional’, and say they can be used with both freespool/spinning reels. Adding guides is easy enough, but repositioning them would be more work.

    #12938
    yellowfin
    Participant

    The spine as I understand it was the spot on the rod where the layers of cloth that make the rod start and stops .Making a spot which may have an extra layer or two of carbon overlapping.
    With the better better manufacturing process’s and the carbon cloth often being cut buy computer the overlap is far far less these days.
    When you cast a fixed spool you start with the guides pointed straight up yes ? and when you have a fish on the guides are pointing the other way so your rod is bending both ways .
    I have a lot of rods and struggle to find the spine on any of the better ones.

    I have just run a line though my solaris and it would work for a freespool …just the butt guide is to big really and I would prefer another 2 at the top but it would work.
    My main fishing rods have 10 or 11 guides

    #13044
    yellowfin
    Participant

    As I said in the other topic I purchased a new Daiwa SL50SHK for $184. The first challenge was spooling it properly. I took it out today, and I casted it fine with the knob on the side done up quite tight, but with it much looser I was getting small birds nests mid flight. But probably even more of a challenge than casting is the fact it has no level wind, so makes things a LOT harder. Caught a few dogfish on it and it seemed a lot of work, but I’m sure after a while it’ll be easier. But since I’ve never used an overhead reel at all, and all my fishing has been with Spinning reels, it makes things a bit harder. Anyone know of any sites that show how to properly spool non-levelwinds and guide line onto the spool etc. I’m not sure exactly how fast to move line side to side on the reel.

    #13050
    yellowfin
    Participant

    Hi Zac

    In the box from the reel there should be a small plastic bag containing 4 small bits of plastic.
    They are the centrifugal brake blocks .The red ones are the ones to start with .To fit them undo the screws on the left hand sideplate and lift it off.
    Once you have done that you should see the end of the spool with a steel pin running crosways across the axle.
    Place one block on each side and reassemble.


    gives you the general idea

    Have a read of http://neilmackellow.sea-angler.org/reel_tuning.html
    the tuning for the 20 and 30 works pretty much the same

    the blocks also have two sides the flat side and a domed side the flat side has more braking the domed has less.

    #13052
    yellowfin
    Participant

    Yeah I was reading about them brake blocks earlier. I’ll fit them before I use the reel next. Will check that link as well. Thanks

    #13055
    yellowfin
    Participant

    For such little bits of plastic it amazing how well they work!
    Dont run the spool adjustment tight its not good for the bearings long term all of my reels have just a hint of side to side play

    #13100
    Miliwolf
    Participant

    That was one of the more entertaining piece of Spam I have read this year. Hopefully someone would clean it up soon.

    #13163
    yellowfin
    Participant

    How are you getting along with the freespool Zac?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 37 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.