Re: Latest catches Spring – 2011

#21228
yellowfin
Participant

nothing wrong with abit of banter.found this which may help- this is off a Aussie forum I work with along with a few others

My preference is to fish the three way dropper rigs with two snelled 6/0 Owner black SSW Needlepoint hooks. A size 5 Owner bead is then pushed over the eye of the front hook (of the snelled hooks). I then use a 2” glow squid on the bottom dropper – the squid sits nicely on the soft bead and stops it being pulled over the hook”
Author: Joff Weston

Ever heard of the euphotic zone? That’s the part of the ocean from the surface to about two hundred metres.
The Euphotic zone (eu – good/ photic – light) is important because light can penetrate this far down and allows photosynthesis to occur. It is alsomost relevant to this article.
Now I certainly don’t have a degree in physics but I do understand that white light slows down when entering a heavier medium than air (like water) and then separates into individual colours – red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet.These colours have differing wave lengths and penetrating power – the red is less penetrating than the violet.
So some light manages to get down to two hundred metres but not all light. I can recall watching an acoustic video,filmed during the Samson Science project off Rottnest once that had managed to capture a jaw dropping amount of Samson fish swimming around in about one hundred metres of water.The thing that struck me instantly is the amount of light that actually penetrates that far down. Iguess most anglers would imagine,as I did, that it would be pretty dark down that far but there was sufficient light to cause shadows on fish caused by other Samson swimming above.
After watching that video my ideas about the use of luminous attractants like squid and the various beads available on the market somewhat waned when fishing offshore in depths up to about a hundred metres.I figured that if there was this much light down that far then how effective could “glowing anything’s” be??
A couple of very good anglers and fishing buddies Dave Woolford – from Tackle World Mindarie and Mick Antonello, had been keeping very tight lipped about certain tricks they were using. I finally got it out of them that they had managed to nab two twenty-plus kilo West Aussie Jewfish in as many weeks.
Actually to say “I finally got it out of them” that they were on a hot streak is not quite true. You see, that’s all we heard out of these two fishing addicts for almost a week after!!!
But to nab those sorts of fish in such a short time definitely warrants a fair whack of high nosing.Dave went on to tell me that they used a few different configurations for their bottom rigs but the main reason why they had been enjoying so much successwas due to the use of glow beads.
They ran swivels directly off the drop line, which were supported by two hard beads and crimped on either side of the bead. This was to position it in the correct spot – pretty clever.
A little while later I spoke to another local bloke who told me he had been using different luminous beads and had caught significantly higher numbers of fish since starting to use them.
The weird thing was that both parties fished mainly in water depths of fifty metres (or less) and swore by the use of a luminescent attractant. Apparently it doesn’t have to be pitch black for a luminescent object to work. They work as soon as the light is reduced – perhaps by white light dispersion?
It was around this time that we started to see the various Taikabura jigs hitting our shelves. These were all built to a similar theme but the ones that seemed to be selling faster and working better were the ones that glowed brighter when the lights went out.
The interesting thing was that the species most interested in the highly visible glowing objects were the ones we generally seek the most. Species such as West Australian jewfish and baldchin groper were becoming very regular captures on these new weird jigs and proved to me there was something about luminous material that works – even in shallow water.
All the gear you will need to tie this dynamite rig
A week later I got out with a mate in shallow country off Mindarie and got to experiment with these a little. It’s always hard to tell if the subtle changes made in the rigs we use does or doesn’t make a huge difference considering the large numbers of variables when fishing but that day we caught fifteen West Australian Jewish and they seemed to be hitting the rigs with beads over any of the other offerings. So much so, there was a flurry of sales the next morning as other crew members were hurrying to even the score.
Last month we fished off the Abrolhos islands and got a chance to really put these to the test while fishing a red hot bite on jewfish – those using these beads absolutely wiped the floor over those who didn’t.
I now always use Owner size 5 soft beads as shown on my three way swivels and have found they tidy up the tag ends of the knots very nicely and reduce the tendency for the rigs to tangle.
My preference is to fish the three way dropper rigs with two snelled 6/0 Owner black SSW Needlepoint hooks. A size 5 Owner bead is then pushed over the eye of the front hook (of the snelled hooks). I then use a 2” glow squid on the bottom dropper – the squid sits nicely on the soft bead and stops it being pulled over the hook.
Owner size 5 glow beads pushed up and over the tag ends of the Oyako crane swivel
The bottom bait is normally a whole squid with the bottom hook going into the head and the top hook going into the top of the tube.The top bait is a mulie which is normally pretty sacrificial unless you are on good ground. Being very soft, they have a tendency to be chewed to pieces by small fish but in doing so can entice other bigger critters.
As I have said above, light does manage to penetrate ocean waters deeper than fifty metres but how fish see these little glowing beads I can’t say. However, I would have to say that I am a convert to using them. They are relatively cheap and if they offer you an advantage, especially in hard fished waters, then they seem a pretty good idea.