Category Archives: Nymphs


Nymphs are flies designed to imitate the sub-surface food of trout. For a description and list of nymph flies see below.

Tying and Fishing the Goddard Caddis with John Hey

Goddard Caddis

Goddard Caddis Goddard Caddis Dedicated fly fisherman we will know that the most prolific food will be the caddis flies. Caddis flies come in two types – cased and uncased. They make their cases from gravel, sand, tiny pebbles and even a discarded case from another caddis. There may be as many as 300 to 400 caddis in a trout’s stomach. More...

by Allan Burgess | Published 4 years ago
By Allan Burgess On Monday, December 15th, 2014
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Dragon Fly Nymph with Ian Cole

The Dragon Fly Nymph Commonly found in our lakes, ponds, backwaters and slow moving streams, the dragonfly; like its more delicate cousin the damselfly, are both members of the Odonata Order. Similarly they both More...

Pheasant Tail-Nymph
By Allan Burgess On Monday, December 15th, 2014
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Pheasant Tail Nymph with John Hey Represents common mayfly nymphs

Pheasant Tail Nymph Pheasant Tail-Nymph Lift a stone in any trout stream and clinging to the underside will be a host of nymphs. The most prolific will be Deleatidium vernale, they are usually in the slow quieter More...

Black bandit nymph.
By Allan Burgess On Wednesday, November 26th, 2014
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Black Bandit Nymph from John Morton by John Hey

From the top: 1. Pull back fibres and tie onto hook. 2. Take one strand of peacock herl and wind to middle, then add appendages. 3. Tie in pheasant tail wing case with tips over eye of hook. Divide and figure eight More...

Nymphs Flies

Nymphs are flies designed to imitate the sub-surface food of trout. Mayflies, their lava stage, in particular, are a very important food source for trout.

The adult mayfly lays her eggs on the surface of the water. The eggs sink to the bottom. Two to three weeks later hatch into very small nymphs. Depending on the mayfly species they remain in this larval nymph stage from as little as a few months to over a year. As they get closer to maturing into flying insects the nymphs darken in colour as their wings and new bodies form.

Finally, they rise to the surface with the aid of air trapped in their now no longer needed disposable cuticle, or as is the case with some species crawl out of the water, spread their wings and take to the air.

For the sake of simplicity, I have also including things like Glo-bugs in this category which imitate fish eggs as they are a sub-surface trout food.